The First in Asia: Taiwan Bans Eating Cats and Dogs April 21 2017

 

Taiwan is the first Asian country to officially ban the sale and consumption of cat and dog meat. A big step forward in the controversial practice that is common among it's Asian neighbours. 

To us fellow Canadians, Americans, and other parts of the world, the thought of eating a cat or dog is horrific and very saddening. But to most of the Asian population, it is no different than consuming a chicken or cow. 

According to the Guardian, anyone caught violating the island’s new regulation can be fined anywhere from NT$200,000 (almost US$7,000) to NT$2 million. In addition to a hefty fine, those that violate the new law could see their names, photographs, and crimes published by the Taiwanese government. What's even better is that repeat offenders could serve time in jail and pay even higher fines.

The cat and dog meat trade has long been a controversial practice, with it's animal rights being non-existent. The way the animals are kept, treated and killed is beyond anything you could call humane.

 

Warning, images below are graphic and not suitable for everyone. 

Cats (and dogs) are kept in extremely small 'crates' with little to no room to move around. They can become dirty and diseased by defecating on each other, and some will even die before they are taken to slaughter due to the poor conditions they are kept in.

They may be starved, fed rotten food, and not given adequate water.

Some insider stories have been leaked that state just like dogs, cats can be drowned, skinned or boiled alive, burnt with a torch flame or even beaten to death. Asians believe it makes the meat more tender due to a higher level of the stress hormones produced just before death. Others are 'humanely' killed with their throats cut, then left to bleed to death.

These images are very upsetting, but it is a hard truth we have to face and bring to light.

 

Yahoo7 reports, the new ban is part of the Taiwanese government’s attempt to make the island more animal-friendly. Other amendments were also passed which implement harsher penalties for crimes committed against all animals. The government wants to stop animal abuse, and are willing to punish those who do not abide by the laws.

More than a decade ago, PETA helped to get the first animal-welfare law passed in Taiwan. PETA President Ingrid Newkirk toured the pounds there and then sat in a cage in Taipei to call attention to the plight of cats and dogs who are drowned and beaten to death.

While the treatment of animals in Taiwan still needs great improvement, we couldn't be more thankful that they are the FIRST Asian country to ban the consumption of our furry little friends that we call pets. Pets that are deeply loved and a part of the family.

We pray that other Asian countries will soon follow this ban, and eating cats and dogs will be a thing of the past.